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Roco Rescue Challenge is Back for 2022!

Thursday, April 28, 2022

Challenge2019teamRev

After two years of pandemic restrictions, Roco Rescue is pleased to announce the return of Roco Rescue Challenge for 2022. For the first time since 2019, this flagship event is returning to the Roco Training Center (RTC) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana on October 19th and 20th.

Kay Goodwyn, President of Roco Rescue, says, “After two years of all the disruptions caused by the pandemic, hosting Rescue Challenge again gives us a sense of normalcy returning. We are very excited to be interacting with rescue teams again at this level.”

The Roco Rescue Challenge has been an ongoing event since 1989. From inception, Rescue Challenge was meant to be far more than just a rescue “competition” that is all about trophies and bragging rights. Rescue Challenge respects the risks—and yes, challenges—that are posed by the confined space environment.

But Rescue Challenge is meant to be enjoyable, and trophy and bragging rights opportunities do abound as well. What Rescue Challenge does a masterful job of is combining realistic learning and new ideas and trends with a competitive edge. What many participants find is that Rescue Challenge builds a rock-solid foundation under their team, providing an acute awareness of their capabilities as well as limitations.

Roco Rescue Challenge is first and foremost about promoting safety and meeting regulatory compliance with regard to confined space rescue response. It is, therefore, very confined space centric by design. The event satisfies OSHA’s 1910.146 requirement for annual training and covers all six (6) types of confined spaces identified in the standard.

It is very common for teams to incorporate feedback from the early scenarios and noticeably improve their techniques before departing the event.

Because Rescue Challenge is a learning event, teams are encouraged to share among themselves what worked in their scenarios as well as what did not. This element of networking amongst teams from varying backgrounds and locales is one of those intangible benefits that most participants feel brings added value to attending.

But it is the team-building aspect of Rescue Challenge where most participants see the biggest growth and benefit. Rescue Challenge removes any homefield advantage and adds in challenging rescue scenarios that are timed. Anyone who has attended will tell you that it is an intense and highly pressurized environment. This is also by design; it is in these types of scenarios where teams best realize their strengths and weaknesses—and grow from both.

Roco-Challenge-2022-300x300After each scenario, the Roco instructors conduct an immediate debrief and provide guidance as to how the scenario could have been improved. It is very common for teams to incorporate feedback from the early scenarios and noticeably improve their techniques before departing the event. When you consider the six laws of learning (readiness, exercise, intensity, etc.), the Roco Rescue Challenge is easily ticking all of those boxes.

Underscoring that Rescue Challenge is a learning event is the training report delivered to each team at the conclusion. These detailed reports list the attendees and describe the types of confined spaces encountered and the skills demonstrated during the scenarios. This focus on training and team growth is one of the distinguishing aspects of Rescue Challenge that separates it from other purely competitive events.

Roco Rescue Challenge is first and foremost about promoting safety and meeting regulatory compliance with regard to confined space rescue response.

But some teams do arrive aspiring to bring home hardware for their efforts. And for those teams, Rescue Challenge has much more to offer. There are two award categories, the first being the Individual Performance Evaluation. This award is given to the team with the best time or highest score on a particular rescue skill or set of skills.

The second, and most coveted, award is for the Team Performance Evaluation, aptly called “The Yellow Brick Road.” This unsolvable rescue scenario rewards the team that follows that road the farthest with no safety violations. While teams are always good-natured going into the Team Performance Evaluation, once immersed in the event, everyone wants to win that trophy. It is precisely this level of excitement that makes the 2022 Roco Rescue Challenge such a unique event.

During the last two years of restricted activities, the rescue world has been hard hit along with the rest of us, and it’s been difficult for teams to train together. But with the restrictions alleviating, it is time for all of us to get back to doing what we do. At Roco, “We Do Rescue,” and at the top of our list is hosting Rescue Challenge again.

We never leave here without having learned something to make ourselves better for when we go back to the plant and lives are on the line.” — Christian B., Shell

Rescue Challenge is held at RTC — a state-of-the-art training center dedicated exclusively to rescue training. It features all six (6) types of confined spaces identified by OSHA and allows the creation of new and innovative rescue scenarios. The realism offered by RTC is one of the key features that attendees to Rescue Challenge comment on frequently.

But what people comment on the most is the sense of comradery they feel between themselves, the staff, and the other teams. Roco staffs the event with its most knowledgeable instructors who all have the singular mission of providing a safe and enjoyable learning event. The sense of togetherness everyone feels toward one another is truly incredible to experience at Rescue Challenge.

So, right when the weather is turning cool, join us on October 19-20, 2022, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, for the return of the Roco Rescue Challenge. Spaces are limited, so enroll early to assure your team a spot. Rescue Challenge is open to all and encourages new teams to attend. Regardless of experience level, we know all participants will develop and grow as a team, bringing home immeasurable experience … and perhaps even a nice trophy too.

For more information about Roco Rescue Challenge, click here. To save your spot and register, click here.

Additional ResourcesChallenge 2018-Day 2 114

 

 

 

2022 Class Schedule

Friday, October 29, 2021

As you're planning for your annual OSHA compliance, maintaining certifications, or training new rescue team members, take a look at our 2022 Open Registration dates. And if you're planning training for your whole team, get a quote for a private course.

See typical course progressions on our Paths Chart:

Roco Rescue Training Paths

Download Path Chart (PDF)

Small-town Department, Big-time Hazards

Monday, August 23, 2021

Many small-town fire departments often have their share of big-time hazards, but perhaps none fits that bill like the Westlake Fire Department in Southwest Louisiana. This department, located on the I-10 industrial corridor, is surrounded by some of the largest petrochemical plants in the nation, and it’s growing daily. And, while maybe small in number, this department must be ready for some of the most diverse hazards possible – many with huge implications for their community.

House Fire by WFD
Westlake firefighters respond to a house fire in Myrtle Springs (photo courtesy WFD)

Winner of Roco's LFCA Training Course Giveaway

With that said, we are extremely proud to have awarded the Westlake Fire Department with FREE Roco training as the winner of our Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials™ Course Giveaway at the Louisiana Fire Chiefs Association (LFCA) annual conference. This course giveaway affords us the opportunity to offer life-saving training while showing our support for all of the hard work that first responders do every day to serve their communities.

We recently sat down with Westlake Fire Department’s Assistant Fire Chief, Jimmy Boyette, to learn a little more about their operation, what drives them and how Roco’s confined space and high angle rescue training can benefit them. Check out our conversation below.


Roco: First, tell us more about your department…what is the makeup of your organization and what sort of emergencies are you responsible for covering?

Westlake FD: Westlake Fire is made up of one Fire Chief, two Assistant Fire Chiefs, three Shift Captains, three Shift Lieutenants, and (when fully staffed) six Firefighters. We are also currently working with the city and our Fire Board to secure more staff members to better assist our rapidly growing area. We respond to the City of Westlake and the surrounding areas (Ward 4, Fire District 3) in Calcasieu Parish. We run fire, rescue, medical, and HAZMAT emergencies in our extremely industrial area.

Roco: Currently, how often does your department conduct training?

Westlake FD: We train three days a month at the Calcasieu training center. We try to stick with a theme or concentration, such as car extraction, medical help, etc. We encourage anyone who shows interest to attend, although it’s hard when there are only seven spots and all 15 of our members want to go!

Roco: What are some of the specific hazards that your department faces and what technical rescue incidents could they pose?

Westlake FD: Our city is surrounded by industry, which presents many potential confined space and high angle scenarios for our department. The multi-billion-dollar Sasol plant expansion took place, essentially, in our backyards – and that is just one of the plants that is local to our area. In our response area also lies the Isle of Capri Casino high-rise construction project along with numerous apartment complexes with more on the way. Then, we have the I-10 Calcasieu River bridge, which poses a continuous hazard for the thousands of travelers on I-10 each day. Add in a passenger rail train, and the fact that we are surrounded on three sides by water – all come with their own unique opportunities for varying types of rescue disciplines.

Roco: Because you are located in such a highly industrialized area, do you have a mutual aid agreement with other agencies? How does that work?

Westlake FD: We are a part of the Southwest LA Mutual Aid Association, which is a large agreement between municipalities and industries to help provide HAZMAT and supplies outside of normal capabilities when needed. Any entity of the association can call upon another member for resources in time of a major disaster or event. When manpower or resources are lacking, members can step in and help each other. The organization meets monthly to keep a pulse on what members and local businesses are doing and how we may be able to partner together.

Roco: Ideally, how many department personnel would you like to be trained in confined space and high angle rescue? Why do your members join the rescue team?

Westlake FD: Because we are a small department, we would like to see everyone rescue trained, but so many still need the right training in order for that to happen. Those who serve on the rescue team generally have a passion for going above and beyond to serve the community. Many of them have generational ties to first responders, and a number of our team members previously served in the military. A common theme we see is that our members want to serve their community after serving their country.

“A common theme we see is that our members want to serve their community after serving their country.”

Roco: What made you seek this training grant from Roco Rescue?

Westlake FD: Our city is in the process of recovering from not only the global pandemic taking an economic toll on nearly all sources of funding (like everyone else), but also a near-direct hit from two back-to-back hurricanes; a once-in-a-generation freeze; and, more recently, the floods that impacted Southwest Louisiana. All of this coming during an already difficult financial recovery due to mismanagement by a previous administration that almost left the city bankrupt. As a result, we are constantly searching to find and take advantage of all sources of free training. For example, we currently use the Lake Charles Fire Academy as an initial training for new employees. The majority of our members have a basic understanding of confined space/rope rescue techniques, but we believe having some (if not all of them) partake in more advanced training will help us flatten the learning curve. We also have a Captain and Assistant Chief who are previous graduates of Roco Rescue – and they have had nothing but great things to say about the level of training and experience of instructors at Roco; their reputation is unmatched.

“Our department leaders have had nothing but great things to say about the level of training and experience of instructors at Roco; their reputation is unmatched.”

Roco: Final question, what makes your team work well together?

Westlake Fire DepartmentWestlake FD: Being small, everyone knows everyone. We fully encompass a total family atmosphere – we don’t just know each other, but we also know each other’s families. Westlake has a big-town feel but it is really a small-town attitude.

“We really encompass a total family atmosphere – we don’t just know each other, but we also know each other’s families.”


Roco applauds the hard work and dedication that every member of the Westlake Fire Department continues to show their community, and we are honored to train alongside this team. They recognized a need for more in-depth training and refused to back down until a solution was found. Assistant Fire Chief Jimmy Boyette stated, “We are in the heart of the industrial area of Lake Charles, which means a special operations division within our department is an absolute must.”

Rescuing from the Bullpen

Friday, April 9, 2021

It is FINALLY that time of year. The sight of freshly mown Kentucky Blue Grass, the smell of $9.00 hot dogs, the taste of $13.00 draft beer. It is that magical moment when America’s pastime – silence football apologist – will once again take its rightful spot at the top of all things important in the sports world.

The sport of baseball has a deep-rooted history and possesses within itself many variables that can affect the outcome of the game. However, there is one component of the game that can be the most decisive reason that a game is won or lost. Let me introduce you to the bullpen pitcher.

Bullpen Pitcher Rescues the Game

It is odd that the person who will be placed in this decisive role does not have the luxury of getting in a rhythm and working out the nervous feelings and rusty movements as the game develops. No, unlike the rest of the players who have built up to a critical moment and are absorbed in the action, the bullpen pitcher must come in cold. Placed in control of a situation that someone else created, he is expected to perform at the highest level to save his team from an undesirable outcome. 

Does this sound familiar to you? Welcome to the lives of every rescuer.

Rescue personnel do not have the luxury of scheduling when they will be called on to perform in very high-stress situations that demand the maximum from their skills to succeed.

What compounds the situation further is the fact that the outcome resulting from the rescuer’s performance is not winning or losing a game, but the lives of individuals. The ability of a rescuer to be inserted in a situation with less than desirable conditions and perform their skills in ways that achieve the desired results requires a unique person and a very high level of training.

Both of these crafts start out the same.

First, it takes an exceptional person to fill these roles and accept the responsibility, and pressure, that each bring.

Both begin by learning all the skills and knowledge they can and develop their abilities through repetition and further understanding of their trade until they are ready to perform. Armed, one literally and one figuratively, with everything they need to be successful, they set out down their chosen path to achieve success and become a notable ally of good. The problem that they both soon recognize is that most of their time is spent waiting, wanting to use the skills that they have spent time perfecting, but stuck wondering when they would get their chance. For rescuers, not having to respond to an incident that requires the use of their skills is a good thing.

A bullpen pitcher may be called in to stop the “bleeding” when the game is on the line. But the bleeding that happens when a rescuer is called involves a human life. 

People who have a calling for these roles did not dedicate their time and effort just to have a good seat in front of the action that is occurring. They want to be in the moment as it is happening, to contribute to gaining the best outcome possible. Neither of these roles have the opportunity to continuously use their skills in the instance they were designed for. But when called upon to execute these skills in a time of need, they must be able to perform with precise talents and in a proficient fashion. Lack of performance from one may get you sent down to the minors, or just out of a job period. The other, however, potentially faces a far worse reality.

Rescuers do not have the benefit of having an “off day” when lives are at stake.

You can’t just go to the bullpen for a new reliever to take your place, you are the last line of defense between someone’s life and serious, sometimes tragic, results.

If you have been in the rescue business long enough for the newness to have worn off your initial training, you know that the knowledge and skills it takes to be a part of a successful rescue team are highly perishable.

Rescue knowledge and skill must be continuously practiced and studied in order to be at the very top of your game.

Just as a reliever who is expected to paint the corners and produce double-play balls, the rescuer must dedicate themselves to working on their required craft to maintain, and improve, their ability to perform. 

A successful bullpen pitcher is a necessity for success, but they are a singular component of the team. To perform at the highest level, the bullpen pitcher needs many components. A good batterymate and solid defense are imperative. A good manager and scouting report give the reliever the direction and information they need to execute. Again, the similarity between the two crafts shows here. A rescuer is an essential component of a successful rescue team. However, a dedicated rescuer who works to be at the top of their rescue skills still must rely on others for success.

team

A team of proficient rescuers who also stay on top of their skills provide the needed defense. A good team leader calling the right pitch serves as the rescuers’ batterymate. Preplanning not only a potential space where rescue may be performed, but all of the variables that may cause unforeseen hazards or impede the rescue efforts serves as a rescuer’s scouting report. A good emergency manager is another critical piece. A team cannot be successful without the funds and time to become proficient. The emergency manager is the piece that fights for the ability to provide the team the opportunity to practice their craft. Annual rescue training is great for “demonstrating and documenting” individual skills proficiency as required in OSHA 1910.146 PRCS, but how confident are you in your skills when you perform them once a year? Continuous training is crucial for the success of any rescue team. 

Both trades will face various situations throughout their career that produce another factor that can impact the outcome of a situation, it is called stress. Lack of preparedness and performance will drastically impact this factor and will assuredly make a bad situation worse. Coming in with 2 outs and nobody on in the 7th to protect a lead will create significantly less stress than coming in with the bases loaded in the bottom of the 9th no outs with a 1 run lead. The same applies to a rescuer responding to a worker with a sprained ankle who can’t climb a ladder in a non-hazardous environment. This situation will produce minimal stress for a rescue team that is not quite up to par with their skills and preparedness. 

However, the same team attempting to rescue three individuals who are unconscious in a confined space with a hazardous atmosphere will experience an exponentially increased amount of stress, which will certainly play a part in the outcome. Both of these situations require skills to be performed, but a team that is not capable in their skills and rescue decision-making process can potentially cause more harm than good for the unfortunate souls needing rescuers to save them from a perilous situation.

The bottom line is this, rescue teams must train often and with a purpose to ensure that they are ready at a moment’s notice, prepared to face the direst of situations, and capable of achieving the best possible outcome. This includes individual rescuers as well as the team working as a unit. No one wants to bear the scars of a rescue gone wrong. Rescuers want to be the ones that made the difference and let someone get home to their family safely.

So, when the skipper comes out in the 9th and calls for the lefty out of the pen, what rescue team will you be? One that is a pitch away from being sent down to the minors or worse sent packing because of their performance? Or the ace reliever who puts the team on his shoulders in game 7 to bring home the Commissioner’s Trophy? Play Ball!


3 Practice Tips from Roco Rescue

Check out our Quick Drills for some in-house practice, or join us for one of our Compliance Rescue Refreshers.

Q & A with Roco Chief Instructors About 2021 Training Courses

Friday, February 12, 2021

My team has always attended the Roco Industrial I/II, will team members attending the new Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials™ course have difficulty fitting in with the team?

Troy-Gardner-headshot-w-Roco-hat-editNot at all. The concept of the Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials course is still focused around producing a well-rounded, proficient rescuer. The primary differences you will notice center around streamlining the techniques utilized by rescuers to be more proficient in “must have” skills, use of updated equipment created through advances in technology, and performing as a member of a team. One of the primary reasons for the course evolving is to provide students with the ability to return as a better TEAM MEMBER and not just a proficient rescuer.

– Chief Instructor Troy Gardner

I previously attended an Industrial I/II course, but it has been several years. What are some of the differences the Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials course provides?

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There are several noticeable differences you will find in the Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials course. The biggest difference you will notice is with the equipment utilized during training. The technological advances in rescue equipment over the last several years are impressive to say the least and offer a safe and more efficient approach to rescue.

For example, the Petzl I’D has been the staple of rescue operations for two decades now. It is hard to find a rescue team that does not utilize the I’D as their primary device, or at least knows of its capabilities. Petzl introduced the Maestro in 2020 which dramatically increased the efficiency of our rescue systems with an intuitive design and ease of functionality that makes it well-received by the beginner and the experienced rescuer alike. Also, devices like the ASAP Lock fit the need of being an engineered safety device while increasing the efficiency and reliability of the operator.

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We also recognized, through input from our instructors, that rescuers would benefit by replacing skills that required continuous practice, such as diamond lashing for patient packaging, with manufactured systems like CMC’s Patient Tie-in System. This allows new rescuers the ability to gain confidence and proficiency by using a simple system vs. trying to absorb more advanced skills and still perform the tasks.

Chris Carlsen, Roco Rescue

Our instructors also recognized the need for students new to rescue to gain a true understanding of how important proper belaying is for safety. To build proficiency in this skill, students are required to “belay a falling load” where they learn the skills necessary to safely and effectively “catch” the load using various techniques.There are several other exciting changes we have made that will benefit the student and produce a higher level of rescuer.

 – Director of Training Chris Carlsen

I work at a fire department that does not respond to any industrial facilities. Would I benefit from attending the Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials course?

Brad Warr, Roco RescueChoosing the right rescue class can be a daunting task. At Roco Rescue, our instructor cadre is well represented by the fire service and would like to include a few questions for you to think about when determining which course you should attend.  

  • Does your response area have multiple story structures that could present difficulties assisting occupants during emergencies using standard means of egress?
  • Do road crews, utility workers or telecommunication industries in your area perform activities above and/or below ground?
  • Have you ever packaged a patient onto a backboard in a cluttered back bedroom and struggled to get them out? only to find that moving the now boarded patient will be extremely difficult utilizing traditional means?
  • Have you ever pushed your SCBA personal skills to their limits in really tight spaces?
  • Has your crew struggled to move a heavy load that left you wondering if there was an easier way?

If you have ever had any of these questions come up, or one of the many other related questions that apply to fire departments across the globe, then Roco’s Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials should be at the top of your list. It addresses both the needs of municipal (urban) rescue as well as that of industrial or manufacturing facilities.

– Chief Instructor Brad Warr

The Industrial I/II course was already a full week with a lot to learn. Will my team members struggle to keep up in the new program?

Eddie Chapa, Roco RescueNot at all. In fact, we believe you will have rescue team members returning to your organization with a higher level of retention than ever before. There are some incredible new advancements in equipment and techniques out there, which make it even easier for the novice to acquire the skills to become a proficient rescuer.

Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials™ has been streamlined to provide a stronger emphasis on key areas of instruction. We have also incorporated numerous improvements in teaching methodology as recommended by our most experienced Roco instructors. This allows students to gain more repetitions in needed skills and retain a higher level of information.

Our goal is to make a better, more prepared rescuer. We believe the new Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials™ from Roco will do just that.

– Chief Instructor Eddie Chapa

Will sending our rescue team members to the Urban and Industrial Essentials course meet OSHA requirements for confined space rescue?

Chris Carlsen, Roco RescueAlthough OSHA does not provide a specific checklist of the skills or exact performance objectives required to be deemed a competent rescuer, 1910.146 Permit Required Confined Spaces does give us some guidance of what a rescuer should be. In 1910.146 (k)(1)(iii)(A) it states that a rescuer shall “Have the ability to reach the victim(s) within a time frame that is appropriate for the permit space hazards(s) identified”. 1910.146(k)(1)(iii)(B) further states that the rescuer shall be “equipped for and proficient in performing the needed rescue services”.

The Roco Essentials™ course is designed for developing a rescuer who is confident and proficient in the skills necessary to perform rescues in both urban and industrial environments. This ensures that students will be able to return to their team and execute the required tasks necessary to expedite rescue efforts safely and effectively.

OSHA 1910.146(k)(1)(ii) also requires that the host employer “evaluate” a rescue team’s ability – in terms of proficiency with rescue-related tasks and equipment, and the ability to function appropriately while rescuing entrants from the particular permit space or types of permit spaces identified. Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials courses conducted at the Roco Training Center provide students with realistic scenarios from all six (6) confined space types, including elevated vessels and towers. The course also includes simulated rescue from IDLH atmospheres requiring the use of SCBA. These scenarios can be used to document a team’s practice requirements listed under 1910.146.

– Director of Training Chris Carlsen

I would really like to send our team members to a Roco certification class, but we do not have the time or funding to dedicate to a Fast-Track course. Is the Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials course a good compromise?

Kenny Greene, Roco RescueI would not consider the Roco Essentials™ course a compromise by any means. It is a building block of rescue knowledge that your team can use to create highly proficient rescuers. The course is designed to give the rescuer confidence in many of the skills needed to obtain certification to NFPA 1006 by utilizing a very heavy “hands-on” approach to training. Rescuers who attend the Urban/Industrial Rescue Essentials course not only obtain a high level of proficiency in these skills, but they also gain a great understanding of what it takes to make a Rescue Team effective. Rescuers completing this course can also achieve Rescue Technician certification by attending our Confined Space Rescue Technician course.

– Chief Instructor Kenny Greene

 

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