Proper Use of Your Skedco Tripod

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Recently, we had a client ask about these specific uses of the Sked-EVAC tripod. Here’s what the manufacturer (Skedco) had to say…

“Is it safe to attach a ‘change of direction’ onto the lower end of one of the tripod legs?”

“No!” According to Bud Calkin, the manufacturer of the tripod. He continues in saying that it is unsafe to pull horizonally on one leg of any tripod because it may cause the tripod to shift and destabilize the system. Skedco recommends the use of a separate anchor in this case.

“Is it acceptable to use the tripod as an ‘A’ frame and lean it over the edge?”

Yes, if you rotate the tripod feet so that the pointed ends of the feet are down and supporting the tripod. According to Skedco, if you are working on a surface that would allow the feet to slip, you must tie or secure the feet in such a manner that they cannot slip and allow the system to collapse.

By using any tripod that has swiveling feet in that configuration (bipod) with the feet flat on a hard surface, you will experience uneven pressure on the edges of the feet as it is leaned over the edge. This could possibly damage the feet because of the angle at which they are turned (i.e., the feet are pointed toward the center of the triangle formed by the tripod). This angle places the weight of the tripod onto the edges of the feet and that is not what they are designed for.

Skedco also says that when using the Sked-Evac tripod as an “A” frame, it is necessary to attach ropes to the two unused anchors that are attached to the head. You can do this by using carabiners. Tie the tripod back in the opposite direction from the load that is being hoisted. This will prevent the tripod from leaning too far over the edge and causing the system to collapse. Check all rigging and attachments for safety prior to lifting any load, especially a human load.

The improper use of any tripod is very dangerous and could be fatal. It is the responsibility of the user to get proper training prior to using a tripod or any other rescue equipment.
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More Than $1.8 Billion in Fiscal Year 2010 Preparedness Grants

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

We received this press release about a grant program some of you may be interested in. Check your eligibility or see if you qualify by clicking to their link.

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano announced more than $1.8 billion in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) preparedness grants designed to help states, urban areas, tribal governments and non-profit organizations enhance their protection, prevention, response and recovery capabilities for risks associated with potential terrorist attacks and other hazards.

“The grants being announced today will help our partners in state, local and tribal governments and non-profit organizations across the country better prepare for, respond to and recover from all threats and hazards,” said Secretary Napolitano. “This funding pays for training for fire fighters, medics and police officers, supports the purchase of equipment that is essential to our first responders, and improves our ability to communicate during disasters. These investments have a direct impact on communities across our country as we work together to build, sustain and improve the resilience of our families, businesses and neighborhoods.”

The Homeland Security Grant Program (HSGP) is the Department’s primary funding mechanism for building and sustaining national preparedness capabilities to help strengthen the nation against the risks associated with potential terrorist attacks and other hazards.

From the Office of the Press Secretary, July 15, 2010. Further information on preparedness grant programs is available at www.dhs.gov and www.fema.gov/grants.
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Roco’s Rescue Team Challenge Fall 2011

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

Rescue Team Challenge is a two-day event that puts industrial rescue teams to the test against confined space and elevated rescue scenarios designed by Roco’s top instructors. The event is limited to six (6) teams only, so reserve space early!

    - Learn from participating in realistic rescue scenarios.
    - Gain confidence in your skills and teamwork abilities.
    - Enjoy excellent training while interacting with rescue pros.
    - Share ideas, experiences, and techniques with teams from across the nation.

OSHA Compliance

    - Document your team’s confined space response capabilities.
    - Meet annual practice requirements in varying confined spaces types.
    - Confirm individual skills proficiency.

Trophies are awarded to the teams with top scores in Individual Skills Proficiency and the infamous “Yellow Brick Road” rescue-relay challenge.

Roco’s Rescue Challenge provides the most realistic rescue experience possible! For information and pricing CALL 800-647-7626.
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Myths and Misunderstandings

Thursday, July 01, 2010

Myths and Misunderstandings
How often have you heard the statement “I will just call 911 if we have a confined space emergency”?  Let’s dispel some common myths and misunderstandings regarding confined space rescue compliance.

In accordance with OSHA 1910.146 (d)(9) an employer that will have personnel entering Permit Required Confined Spaces at their workplace must “develop and implement procedures for summoning rescue and emergency services, for rescuing entrants from permit spaces, for providing necessary emergency services to rescued employees, and for preventing unauthorized personnel from attempting a rescue.

Meeting this requirement can be accomplished in several ways…

    - Develop an in-house rescue team made up of host employees.
    - Contract with an outside third party rescue team.
    - Coordinate with local emergency services (“911”).

Whatever way an employer chooses, there are specific evaluation criteria that must be met according to 1910.146 (k)…

The rescue team must be capable of responding in a timely manner and reaching the victim(s) within an appropriate amount of time based on the hazards of the confined space.  On-site teams (in-house or third party contracted teams) are generally better able to meet this requirement.

The team must be equipped and proficient in performing the type(s) of rescue that may be encountered.  Can they walk the walk, or just talk the talk?

The employer shall ensure at least one member of the rescue team is currently certified in CPR/First Aid.

The employer shall also ensure that the designated rescue team practices making permit space rescues at least once every 12 months from the actual spaces or representative spaces in regards to opening size, configuration, and accessibility. Representative spaces shall simulate the types of permit spaces from which rescue is to be performed.

Non-Mandatory Appendix F – Rescue Team/Rescue Service Evaluation Criteria

These are some but not all of the requirements of an initial and periodic performance evaluation of the rescue team:

At a minimum, if an offsite rescue team is being considered, the employer must contact the service to plan and coordinate the evaluation of the team based on 1910.146 (k).  Merely posting the service’s phone number or planning to rely on “911” to obtain these services at the time of a permit space emergency would not comply with paragraph (k)(1) of the standard.

Can the rescue team respond in an appropriate amount of time based on the hazards of the space?  For known IDLH hazards or hazards that can quickly develop into IDLH conditions, on scene rescue standby is required.  For non- IDLH hazards, a response time of 10-15 minutes may be adequate.

Will the offsite rescue team be available to respond to a confined space incident or is there a potential they will be out of service on a separate incident and unable to respond?

If necessary, can the rescue service properly package and retrieve victims from a permit space that has a limited size opening (less than 24 inches in diameter) or from a space that has internal obstacles or hazards? Does the service have the capability to provide rescue from an elevated location using high angle rescue techniques?

About the Author:
Patrick Furr, employed with Roco since 2000, has been actively involved with technical rescue since 1981. He is a Roco Chief Instructor as well as a Team Leader for our on-site safety services in New Mexico. Pat teaches Confined Space Rescue, Rope Access, Tower Work/Rescue and Fall Protection programs across North America. He is a retired U.S. Air Force MSgt/Pararescueman.
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Can a munter hitch be used with a two-person load?

Thursday, July 01, 2010

Yes, with a couple of extra precautions.

    •    The rope should run over an edge for extra control.
    •     A line tender should be added to assist the primary belayer.

 

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