New from OSHA: Is 911 your Confined Space Rescue Plan?

Monday, May 16, 2016

New from OSHA: Is 911 your Confined Space Rescue Plan?OSHA has a new Fact Sheet for “Confined Spaces in Construction” that is designed to keep workers and emergency responders safe in permit-required confined spaces.

The new document from OSHA stresses that employers must select a service that has the ability to respond and conduct rescue in a timely manner based on site conditions and potential hazards specific to the space. It also states that “an employer who relies on local emergency services for assistance is required to meet the requirements of 1926.1211-Rescue and emergency services.”

This Fact Sheet includes information for emergency response providers along with key questions to consider before making a commitment to respond. It also emphasizes the importance of preplanning while encouraging service providers to work closely with employers in order to be properly prepared for the challenges they may face.

Click here to download OSHA Fact Sheet.

“Permit-required confined spaces can present conditions that are immediately dangerous to workers’ lives or health if not properly identified, evaluated, tested and controlled.”

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New CS Types Chart & Compliance Guide

Wednesday, May 04, 2016

Roco Rescue Confined Space Types Chart & Compliance GuideThis helpful new guide provides information for evaluating your rescue team or prospective rescue service based on the requirements of OSHA 1910.146 and 1926 Subpart AA. It includes a Rescue Team Evaluation Checklist from Appendix F and illustrates Confined Space Types 1-6, which is based on criteria from OSHA 1910.146. Roco’s method of categorizing confined spaces by various types can be useful in establishing practice requirements for your rescue service.

Responding in a safe, effective and timely manner to the various types of permit-required confined spaces at your facility is required by OSHA regulations 1910.146 (PRCS) and 1926 Subpart AA Confined Spaces in Construction.
An effective response by your rescue service is crucial to the safety of workers who are tasked with entering confined spaces to perform their job duties.

In order to be prepared, rescue teams can use this chart to plan their practice drills to include all of the various types of confined spaces. Appendix F of 1910.146 states that rescuers may practice in representative spaces that are considered “worst case” or most restrictive with respect to internal configuration, elevation and portal size. This illustrated guide will serve as a reminder to be prepared for the unexpected when planning for confined space emergencies for the safety of the rescuers and the entrants.

Register to Receive Your Free Confined Space Rescue Types Chart & Compliance Guide

Just give us your info, and Roco will mail you a copy.

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What is a Competent Person?

Wednesday, March 02, 2016

What is a Competent Person?Many OSHA standards, especially in construction, require a “competent person” to be designated at the jobsite. Filling this role requires proper training, relevant experience to the work being performed and adequate knowledge of the associated regulations. 

The competent person should be able to recognize critical hazards as well as have the authority to take the action needed to mitigate hazards. It’s much more than just picking someone to fill a slot.

A previous article, "What is a Competent Person?" found in the National Safety Council's Safety+Health publication, talks about how the term is often taken too lightly. Again, it's much more than just selecting a body to fill a role or attending one 10-hour training class covering all the various standards. Competency must be considered and evaluated for this important role. 

At a minimum, your designated competent person should meet the following minimum qualifications:
(1)    A high level of understanding of the types of hazards typically encountered in that area of work;
(2)    A solid review of applicable standards relating to that type of work; and,
(3)    A thorough understanding of types of solutions to control or eliminate the hazards
.

To assist in preparing your competent person in fall protection, we encourage you to register for Roco's Fall Protection
Competent Person - April 4-5, 2016 course in Baton Rouge. This course will provide practical experience in recognizing fall hazards and developing appropriate measures for reducing or eliminating those hazards. 

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New World of Worker Safety: DOL & DOJ Reach Agreement

Monday, February 22, 2016

Source: Safety+Health Magazine February 2016

New World of Worker Safety: DOL & DOJ Reach AgreementWashington – A recent agreement between the Departments of Labor and Justice will launch a “new world of worker safety” by holding managers and supervisors criminally accountable for violations of the law, agency officials announced Dec. 17.

The two departments signed a memorandum of understanding that pools their resources toward the prosecution of individuals who willfully disregard labor and environmental statutes, according to John Cruden, assistant attorney general for the DOJ’s Environment and Natural Resources Division, who spoke at a press conference moments after the memo was signed.

For the past several years, OSHA and DOJ have worked with each other on certain cases, but the new agreement formalizes that relationship.

This cooperation could lead to hefty fines and prison terms for employers and individuals convicted of violating a number of related laws. For example, a roofing contractor recently pleaded guilty to violating an OSHA law, lying to inspectors and attempting to cover up his crime; he could be sentenced up to 25 years in prison.

“Strong criminal sanctions are a powerful tool to ensure employers comply with the law and protect the lives, limbs and lungs of our nation’s workers,” OSHA administrator David Michaels told reporters at the press conference.

Deborah Harris, DOJ’s Environmental Crimes Section chief, said prosecutions would be open to “the ones making the decisions that lead to the deaths of others,” which could include people in the corporate office, as well as managers and supervisors.

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NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spaces

Thursday, January 07, 2016
“Up until NFPA Issues New Guide for Confined Spacesnow, requesting or researching OSHA Letters of Interpretation or checking with other safety professionals was the means to get a clearer picture of ‘how’ to accomplish safe and compliant confined space entry. NFPA's Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry (NFPA350) helps to bridge that area from regulation to compliance. It is a ‘must have’ resource for safety professionals, confined space owners/workers and rescuers as well,”  states, Dennis O'Connell, Director of Training for Roco Rescue, who served as an alternate committee member for NFPA 350.

Here's more from NFPA on their new guide...

Every year, confined space incidents result in worker deaths, injuries, and serious illnesses. The danger is widespread because all facilities can have confined spaces - from commercial buildings and hospitals to public works, utilities, and chemical/industrial facilities. By U.S. law, employees must comply with applicable regulations such as OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.146 and 29 CFR 1926 Subpart AA to ensure personnel safety. However, these regulations tell you 'what' to do, not 'how' to identify, evaluate, and control confined space hazards or conduct rescue response.

NFPA has just introduced NFPA 350: Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work. This all-new guide is essential for anyone who enters confined spaces, along with facility managers, code officials, and safety personnel. NFPA 350 explains how to protect workers who enter into confined spaces for inspection or testing, or to perform associated work. Provisions address the full range of special hazards, including those present in water treatment, petrochemical, and agricultural facilities. It provides information to assist companies that need to comply with OSHA's Permit-Rquired Confined Spaces (29 CFR 1910.146) among other standards. In addition, NFPA 350 helps fire service and emergency services personnel develop and evaluate plans for confined space rescue in conjunction with NFPA 1670: Standard on Operations and Training for Technical Search and Rescue Incidents.

This guide will help you be prepared to recognize, evaluate, and control confined space entry hazards. Follow practices developed by experts for: 

    • • Identification of Confined Spaces
    • • Evaluation of Hazards
    • • Atmospheric Monitoring
    • • Hazard Elimination and Control
    • • Ventilation
    • • Rescue and Rescue Planning
    • • Confined Space Personnel Duties, Responsibilities, and Competencies
    • • Pre-Entry Evaluation Forms and Permits
    • • Management of Change
    • • Prevention Through Design
    • • OSHA Alternate Entry Procedures and Reclassification (Annex C)

As an added note, NFPA 350 looks at all confined spaces from a different prospective- i.e., all spaces are treated as "permit required" until it is proven that entry is safe or the proper precautions have been taken. This guide's impact in confined space work and rescue will be significant in reducing risk and meeting compliance issues. For more information, visit NFPA.org.

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